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New: Solving Problems in 1 Hire? Wendy Caster
New: On Creativity
Strong-Cuevas
New: Decades of Attending College Art Association’s Annual Meeting
                   Gail Levin
New:
Paterson- A Review by Christina Turczyn

Taking Stock
Raymond J. Steiner
Alaska Not just about Wildlife and Glaciers: Art Walk in
                   Juneau Cornelia Seckel
“Harlow” falling in love with the Big Screen
by Keith Nieto
Freedom in Imagery found in Los Angeles this Winter
                   Jean Bundy
Picabia and Dance Dawn Lille
New:
Calendar listings
New: Opportunites & Calls for entries
Poetry by Amie Ilva Tatem and Peter LaVilla & Fiction by Don Maurer
Cornelia Seckel's Blog: What's up and more

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New Peek and Piques: Taking Stock
By Raymond J. Steiner
Cornelia Seckel & Raymond J. Steiner.  A toast as the last ink on paper issue of ART TIMES is ready to go to the print
Cornelia Seckel & Raymond J. Steiner.
A toast as the last ink on paper issue of ART TIMES is ready to go to the print

Although, when Cornelia and I co-founded ART times back in 1984, we did not set ourselves up as a not-for-profit entity, we soon discovered that de facto, regardless of our intent, it would indeed be a not-for-profit enterprise.
…More than once over the years — and especially during the last few — we’ve been asked why we stay in business. We look at each other, at the questioners, and mostly just shrug. But, Yes! Why do we continue? Our answer sounds a little corny but to put it into one word, the answer always was and remains: altruism. (see essay)

New Theater: Solving Problems in one Hire?
By Wendy Caster

As you probably already know, the New York Times recently gave the job of Co-Chief Theater Critic, one of the most powerful positions in theater, to Jesse Green of New York magazine. In the five days since the announcement, I’ve been chewing on the news that the Times took the radical, ground-breaking step of hiring a gay white man, educated at Yale, for the job. (Yes, that’s sarcasm.) ……(see essay)

New Film: Paterson- A Review
By Christina Turczyn
Cornelia Seckel & Raymond J. Steiner.  A toast as the last ink on paper issue of ART TIMES is ready to go to the print

Paterson, written and directed by Jim Jarmusch, begins with the line, “Here is the most beautiful match in the world.” Starring Adam Driver and Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani, it is a quiet but powerful film that unfolds through the routine of a bus driver’s week, yet is about so much more. I immediately think about whether the spark alluded to is poetry. Or the city itself. It might also be desire, or love, as this is a love story.
(see essay)

New Art Essay: Decades of Attending College Art Association’s
Annual Meeting
By Gail Levin

…. “There are no facts,” I heard a theorist proclaim at CAA in the mid-1980s. I recall this with irony now that our politicians in Washington talk about “alternative facts” and “fake news.” At the recent CAA meeting in New York, I asked a prominent critical theorist how this could have happened. The response I got is that the right wing has taken over theory and turned it into “an alternate reality.” (see essay)

New Art Essay: On Creativity
By Strong-Cuevas

Creation begins with a wish, a desire to do something, to make something, to see beyond the immediate reality. If we are lucky, it will open a door to a stream of thought that is inspiration. We inspire, we breathe in ideas.
What inspires me, what are my themes? I like thinking about physics, the universe. And I am drawn to spiritual ideas, yoga. (see essay)

Dance: Picabia and Dance
By Dawn Lille
Picabia in the 1924 film Entr’acte, part of the ballet Relâche

The exhilarating thing about this exhibition was that Picabia, who was committed to the sensation of the new and reveled in the conflicts he saw between the “isms” of his times, is still challenging. As he switched from dadaism, to cubism, surrealism, abstraction and realism, and then kept changing back and forth, his work was always fresh, interesting and new. The title covering his exhibition, a quote from him, says it all . (see essay)

Picabia in the 1924 film Entr’acte, part of the ballet Relâche

Art Review: Freedom in Imagery found in Los Angeles this Winter
By Jean Bundy
“Willem de Kooning” by Elaine de Kooning  (scanned by the Author from the exhibition catalog)

Four West Coast exhibitions illustrate how art portrays a variety of freedoms. Moholy-Nagy represented the positive aspects of technological advancements once away from social and economic oppression. The eighteenth century Bouchardon, representational as was the custom, earned a living sculpting the powerful. Abstract Expressionism symbolized the United States as superpower after winning a world war.
(see essay)

“Willem de Kooning” by Elaine de Kooning
(scanned by the Author from the exhibition catalog)

Film: Harlow and fallling in love with the Big Screen
By Keith Nieto
“Willem de Kooning” by Elaine de Kooning  (scanned by the Author from the exhibition catalog)

…Lights and titles flickered on the immense outdoor screen announcing the film Harlow. Harlow? Although at that tender age I knew nothing about Jean Harlow, I instantly fell in love with the 40 foot image of the beautiful platinum blonde portrayed by Caroll Baker. That night my eight year old senses were overwhelmed by the monochromatic splendor of searing platinum blonde, silvery white bias-cut gowns, glamorous sets, and glorious sweeping music by Neal Hefti. Years later I discovered just how inaccurate this film was in portraying the short life of the iconic star.… (see essay)
Jean Harlow